Eviction Study Advisory Board Members

Peggy Bailey

Peggy Bailey is the Vice President of Housing Policy at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities where she oversees the Center’s work to protect and expand access to affordable housing for people with low-incomes. Prior to becoming Vice President of Housing Policy, Bailey served as the director of “Connect the Dots: Bridging Systems for Better Health”, a CBPP initiative that identifies opportunities to strengthen the link between housing and health policy. Throughout her career, she has provided vision and leadership as health, child welfare, and other systems of care recognize that access to affordable housing is a growing need for people with low incomes. Prior to joining the Center in January 2016, Bailey served as Director of Health Systems Integration for the Corporation for Supportive Housing where she focused on finding sustainable funding sources for the services that people with histories of homelessness and chronic health conditions need to maintain their housing. Bailey also worked for the National Alliance to End Homelessness and the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. Bailey holds a B.A in Government from the University of Notre Dame, and a Master of Public Affairs degree from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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Emily A. Benfer

Emily A. Benfer is a visiting professor of law and the director of the Health Justice Clinic at Wake Forest School of Law. Her clinic practice and research focus on addressing social determinants of health, racial inequity, and poverty with an emphasis on housing, as well as community-based approaches to access to justice and health equity. Prof. Benfer has testified before Congress, published widely, and appeared in numerous media outlets on these topics. She has conducted policy surveillance and legal mapping of housing laws across the fifty states, including proactive rental inspection laws. Currently, she is the Chair of the American Bar Association’s COVID-19 Task Force Committee on Eviction and co-creator of the COVID-19 Housing Policy Scorecard with the Eviction Lab at Princeton University. Prof. Benfer is the principal investigator in a study of nationwide COVID-19 eviction moratoriums and housing policies. She was an Equal Justice Works Fellow at the Washington Legal Clinic for the Homeless and a Peace Corps volunteer. She has received numerous commendations, including the American Public Health Association David P. Rawl Award for Advocacy, and was recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the Top 40 Lawyers Under 40. Prof. Benfer has a B.A. from Providence College, a J.D. from Indiana University School of Law, and an LL.M. from Georgetown University Law Center.

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Elizabeth Chambliss

Elizabeth Chambliss is the Henry Harman Edens Professor of Law and Director of the Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough Center on Professionalism at the University of South Carolina. Her research focuses on new models for legal services delivery and the development of data and standards for evaluating the quality of civil legal assistance. Prof. Chambliss serves on the South Carolina Access to Justice Commission, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences Legal Services Design Project, and the Editorial Advisory Board of Law & Society Review. She received a B.S. from the College of Charleston and a J.D. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin.

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Fairlie A. Dalton

Fairlie A. Dalton is a judge in the Massachusetts Housing Court. After graduating from Regis College in Weston, MA and Harvard Law School, she worked as a housing attorney at Neighborhood Legal Services for more than 22 years representing northeastern Massachusetts tenants in eviction cases in District, Housing and Superior Courts, in administrative proceedings before housing authorities and government agencies, and in Sanitary Code enforcement cases. Before being appointed to the bench in 2014, she served for 8 years as the first assistant clerk-magistrate at the Northeast Housing Court. Upon her mandatory retirement in March 2020 as the first justice of the Northeast Housing Court, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court appointed her as a recall judge for the Housing Court. She now serves in Housing Court divisions throughout the state and chairs the Housing Court’s Post Pandemic Planning Committee charged with designing court procedures to address post-moratorium eviction cases. Judge Dalton is a past member of the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission and the Trial Court Race and Implicit Bias Advisory Committee and is a past president of the Lawrence Bar Association. Throughout her legal career, she has been an instructor for Massachusetts Continuing Legal Education, the Department of Mental Health, the Housing Court, and the Judicial Outreach Program. She has authored articles for MCLE on landlord-tenant law, discrimination, reasonable accommodation in housing, and housing court trial practice.

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Mark Fessler

Mark Fessler is the head of the Housing Unit at South Carolina Legal Services (SCLS).  He joined SCLS in 2008 in the wake of the housing crisis and recession that exploded that year.  He was named SCLS new lawyer of the year.  In 2015 he became the lead foreclosure attorney for SCLS.  He is a former member of the S.C. Bar’s Consumer Law Section Council. Mr. Fessler earned a B.A. from Furman University and a J.D. from the University of South Carolina School of Law.

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John Greacen

After a distinguished career as a court administrator in the federal and state courts – managing both trial and appellate courts and serving as Director of the New Mexico Administrative Office of the Courts, Mr. Greacen has spent the past twenty years consulting on many topics for courts in 35 states and 4 foreign countries. Mr. Greacen received the National Association for Court Management Award of Merit in 1999, the OASIS Distinguished Contributor Award in 2013, the Ernest J. Friesen Award from the Justice Management Institute in 2017, and the Meyer Elkin Essay Award from the Association of family and Conciliation Courts in 2020. Mr. Greacen is Project Consultant to the Self-Represented Litigation Network and Special Projects Advisor to the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System. He was consultant to the Pew Charitable Trust for its development of an access to civil justice funding program in 2017. He served as consultant to the Legal Services Corporation in 2012-13 planning and facilitating its Summit on the Use of Technology to Enhance Access to Justice and drafting the Summit Report, which first articulated the goal of “providing some form of effective assistance to 100% of persons with essential civil legal needs” which the LSC Board incorporated into its mission statement, the Conference of Chief Justices and Conference of State Court Administrators adopted as an aspirational goal for all state courts in its Resolution 5 in 2015 and motivated the Public Welfare Foundation to initiate the Justice for All initiative to make the goal a reality, now underway in 14 states. He is best known for his 1995 article on how court staff can distinguish legal information from legal advice. His most recent publication is Eighteen Ways Courts Should Use Technology to Better Serve Their Customers, issued by the Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System in late 2018.

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Nan Heald

Nan Heald grew up in rural Maine and has served as the Executive Director of Pine Tree Legal Assistance (PTLA) since 1990. Prior to her current position, Ms. Heald worked as a federal government attorney and in private practice before joining Pine Tree’s’ Native American Unit in 1985. She has been actively involved in numerous statewide and national initiatives over the past 30 years and currently serves on the WebJunction / LSC Advisory Board and as a member of the LSC Veterans Task Force. Ms. Heald has a B.A. from Smith College and a J.D. from the George Washington University School of Law.

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Jeffrey M. Hearne

Jeffrey M. Hearne is the Director of Litigation at Legal Services of Greater Miami, Inc., where he oversees the firm's significant litigation and provides a strategic focus to the firm's advocacy in all its practice areas. Mr. Hearne previously served as the Advocacy Director for the Tenants' Rights unit and is the Director of the Tenants’ Rights Clinic at the University of Miami School of Law. He currently serves on the Florida Bar’s Civil Procedure Rules Committee and is a former co-chair of the Florida Housing Umbrella Group, the statewide association of tenant advocates. He has received several honors for his work representing tenants, including the Consumer Protection Lawyer of the Year from the Florida Bar’s Consumer Protection Law Committee (2018), and the Housing Justice Award from the National Housing Law Project (2015) for his “successful and dynamic pursuit of housing justice for people most in need.” Mr. Hearne earned a B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Danielle Hirsch

Danielle Hirsch is a Principal Court Management Consultant at the National Center for State Courts. In this capacity, her focus is to provide advanced management consulting work to courts and their partners at the state and local level, primarily focused on access to justice and business process simplification issues in the civil courts. In her time with the National Center for State Courts, Ms. Hirsch has provided intensive technical assistance to access to justice teams, courts, judicial systems and other stakeholders in many states; and she serves as the lead staff for the Conference of Chief Justices/Conference of State Court Administrators’ Access and Fairness Committee and the Post-Pandemic Planning Technology Working Group. She also serves as Project Director for the national Justice for All Initiative and works with the Pew Charitable Trusts around civil just system modernization. In addition, Ms. Hirsch is the co-host of NCSC’s Tiny Chats, offering free, digestible and creative short-form educational videos and discussions about access to justice and court operations topics court staff and interested stakeholders. She received a B.A. from Oberlin College and a J.D. from the University of Illinois College of Law.

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Amy Dunn Johnson

As the Arkansas Access to Justice Commission’s Executive Director for more than a decade, Amy Dunn Johnson coordinates statewide efforts to address the civil legal needs of low-income Arkansans through policy initiatives, resource development, public education, and legislative advocacy. She also staffs the Arkansas Access to Justice Foundation and Arkansas IOLTA Program, which engage in resource development and grantmaking initiatives to support the objective of increasing access to justice. During her time with Arkansas Access to Justice, Ms. Johnson has overseen a number of major initiatives, including development of a statewide strategy for the delivery of services to self-represented litigants, completion of a study of the economic impact of civil legal aid, and court rule changes to increase access to justice and funding for legal aid. Ms. Johnson has served as a board member for numerous organizations that work to improve health and equity, including Harmony Health Clinic, which she helped co-found. She earned a B.A. from and a J.D. from the University of Arkansas Bowen School of Law. She also is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Community Health Leader. She was elected 15th Division Circuit Judge in November 2020.

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Ashley E. Lowe

Ashley E. Lowe is the Chief Executive Officer of Lakeshore Legal Aid. Ms. Lowe has been leading Lakeshore’s efforts to establish a right to counsel in eviction cases in Detroit and oversees an eviction diversion project in the Detroit Metro region providing attorneys in more than 30 courts. Prior to joining Lakeshore, Ms. Lowe was the Associate Director of Clinical Education at Wayne State University Law School and also taught at Western Michigan University Thomas M. Cooley Law School, where she founded and directed the Family Law Assistance Project. Earlier in her career, Ms. Lowe was the Director of Legal Services at the Women’s Survival Center in Pontiac and worked in private practice. Active in the State Bar, Ms. Lowe chairs the Justice Initiatives Committee and is part of the Justice for All taskforce. Ms. Lowe earned her law degree and Master of Business Administration degree at Georgetown University.

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Jesse Hamilton McCoy II

J. Hamilton McCoy is a Senior Lecturing Fellow and Supervising Attorney for Duke University School of Law’s Civil Justice Clinic. In that capacity he teaches two seminar courses: Civil Justice Clinic and Social Justice Lawyering, respectively.  Prof. McCoy also mentors students in developing and improving basic civil litigation skills, and oversees their handling of cases for indigent clients who are often unable to obtain adequate representation in the traditional civil justice system through the clinic’s partnership with Legal Aid of North Carolina (LANC). In addition, Prof. McCoy operates within Durham County’s Eviction Diversion Program, charged with objective of reducing the number of eviction judgments in Durham County, North Carolina. He received a B.A. from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University and a J.D. from North Carolina Central University School of Law.

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Yvonne Mariajimenez

Yvonne Mariajimenez is the President and CEO for Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County (NLSLA), a private, non-profit LSC-funded legal aid program. NLSLA has a budget of $21 million, a staff of 150, including more than 70 lawyers who provide free legal services and advocacy to poor and low-income individuals and families residing in Los Angeles County. Ms. Mariajimenez has a demonstrated background in litigation and policy advocacy in those areas that most impact the poor: housing and homeless prevention, Domestic Violence/Family, Immigration, public benefits, and access to health care. She is a champion of Medical Legal Community Partnerships, and in 2019 through NLSLA efforts, the model became a permanent feature of the LA County health delivery system. She is a self-proclaimed beneficiary of the difference LSC programs make in the lives of clients as legal aid represented her mother when she was a child; the work of legal is personal to her as she grew up in the communities served by NLSLA. Yvonne earned a B.S. from the University of Southern California and a J.D. at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.

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Frank Neuner

Frank X. Neuner, Jr. was nominated to serve on the Board of Directors of the Legal Services Corporation by President Donald Trump, and the U.S. Senate confirmed his nominationon August 1, 2019. Neuner is a partner at NeunerPate based in Lafayette, Louisiana. Prior to his appointment to the Legal Services Corporation Board of Directors, he was a member of Legal Services Corporation’s Governance and Performance Review Committee and Operations and Regulations Committee. He also served on Legal Services Corporation’s Disaster Task Force and Co-Chairs LSC’s Eviction Task Force. As a founder and Managing Partner of NeunerPate, Neuner oversees a law firm that has grown from 4 lawyers with a staff of 4 to 29 lawyers with a staff of 70. His practices focuses on commercial litigation, admiralty and maritime law, insurance employment law, and toxic tort litigation. Neuner is the Chairman of the Innocence Project New Orleans and the President of the Louisiana Client Assistance Foundation. He is a past Chair of the Louisiana Public Defender Board where he served from 2008 to 2013. In this role, he led the drive for legislation to provide defense for the indigent. He is also a past President of the Louisiana State Bar Association and is a member of numerous professional and community services organizations. He is a past President and Campaign Chair of the United Way of Acadiana, past Chair of One Acadiana, Inc., and Co-Chair of the Lafayette Outreach for Civil Justice. He is a recipient of the American Bar Association Solo & Small Firm Lifetime Achievement Award, the Louisiana Bar Foundation 2013 Distinguished Attorney Award, Louisiana State University Law School Distinguished Alumni of the Year in 2008 and been listed in Louisiana Super Lawyers since 2004. He holds a B.S. and a J.D. from Louisiana State University.

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Raun Rasmussen

Mr. Rasmussen was named Executive Director of Legal Services NYC in June 2011. He has been a member of the LSNYC family for over 30 years, serving as LSNYC's Chief of Litigation and Advocacy since 2003. He began his career as a housing attorney at South Brooklyn Legal Services (SBLS) and later became SBLS's Director of Litigation, supporting the development of affirmative litigation and helping to create one of the first foreclosure prevention projects in the country. Mr. Rasmussen has written numerous articles on residential displacement, foreclosure, ethics, affirmative litigation, and childcare work, and has received several awards for his public service. He is a member of the Permanent Commission on Access to Justice and the Boards of Directors of the New Economy Project and the New York Legal Services Coalition. He holds a B.A. from Amherst College and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

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Julie Reiskin

Julie Reiskin was nominated to serve on the Board of Directors of the Legal Services Corporation by President Barack Obama on December 17, 2009, and her nomination was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on March 29, 2010. Reiskin, Licensed in Clinical Social Work, is the Executive Director of the Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition (CCDC). Its mission is to advocate for social justice for people with all types of disabilities. CCDC has taken a leadership role within Colorado on disability policy--particularly in health care--and ensuring that people with disabilities have a voice in shaping disability policy. Prior to becoming the Executive Director for CCDC in 1996, Reiskin served as the organization's policy analyst. Before moving to Colorado she worked in Connecticut, as a partner at a consulting firm specializing in diversity issues throughout Southern New England. She also had a private psychotherapy practice and worked on grassroots organizing and positive youth development with several organizations in Connecticut. Reiskin teaches in the areas of Disability Rights, Disability Cultural Competency, Policy Advocacy, Nonprofit Program Development and Practice, Client/Constituent Engagement and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. She consults with other organizations to help them develop and practice real and meaningful client involvement. She is an adjunct faculty with the University of Denver Graduate School of Social Work. Reiskin serves on the Boards of the Denver Foundation, the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, and the National Pain Advocacy Center.

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Eva Rosen

Eva Rosen is an Assistant Professor at Georgetown University's McCourt School of Public Policy. Her research focuses on housing vouchers, eviction, and landlord practices. Her recently published book, The Voucher Promise: “Section 8” and the Fate of an American Neighborhood, is an examination of the largest U.S. housing subsidy program, housing vouchers. Delving into the connections between safe, affordable housing and social mobility, The Voucher Promise investigates the profound benefits and formidable obstacles involved in housing America’s poor. Her current research examines landlord behavior in the low-end rental market in four cities (Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas, and Washington, DC).  She is the co-author of a recent study on eviction trends in Washington, DC. She earned a B.A. from Barnard College of Columbia University, a Masters in Sociology from Harvard University, and Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy, at Harvard University.

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Radhika Singh

Radhika Singh leads the National Legal Aid and Defender Association’s (NLADA) civil legal services division, working with civil legal aid providers across the country. She represents the civil legal aid community in advocacy and education efforts with federal representatives and in national conversations focused both on civil legal aid's substantive work and increasing resources to support this work. Ms. Singh also leads NLADA's Project to Advance Civil Legal Aid Collaborations, advocating for federal funding and policies to integrate civil legal aid into cross-sector collaborations that serve low-income and vulnerable populations and advance federal objectives. She previously worked in engagement and advocacy at Equal Justice Works and as a staff attorney at the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, focusing on constitutional and civil rights litigation and advocacy. Ms. Singh received a B.A. from American University and a J.D. from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles.

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Jorge Soto

Jorge Andres Soto is Associate Vice President of Policy and Advocacy with the National Fair Housing Alliance (NFHA). Jorge leads NFHA’s federal relations and advocates on behalf of its member organizations before Congress and federal agencies, coordinating efforts with advocacy and industry groups on civil rights matters concerning fair housing and lending issues. Jorge is also Co-Chair of the Fair Housing and Lending Task Force of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a coalition responsible for advancing fair housing policy at the federal level. Prior to NFHA, Jorge was at Relman, Dane & Colfax PLLC where he worked as a civil rights paralegal on several fair housing, fair lending, and public accommodations cases, and also conducted public policy consulting concerning employment and contracting diversity in federal financial regulatory agencies. Jorge also previously worked as a labor organizer at Service Employees International Union (SEIU) and community organizer with CRECEN/American Para Todos, Houston, Texas. Jorge earned his B.A. in History and American Studies from Wesleyan University.

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Quinten Steenhuis

Quinten Steenhuis is a clinical fellow and adjunct professor at Suffolk University Law School in the Legal Innovation and Technology Lab. Quinten was a senior housing attorney, systems administrator, and developer at Greater Boston Legal Services, where he worked between 2008 and 2020. He currently teaches courses including Legal Technology for Small Firm Practice and Lawyering in the Age of Smart Machines. Quinten’s signature projects include MADE, the Massachusetts Defense for Eviction tool which he conceived and created at Greater Boston Legal Services, and the MassAccess Project, a COVID-19 emergency response collaboration at Suffolk Law School involving an international team of participants.

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Esther Sullivan

Esther Sullivan is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research focuses on poverty, spatial inequality, urban governance, and housing, with a special interest in both forced and voluntary relocation. Her 2018 book Manufactured Insecurity: Mobile Home Parks and Americans' Tenuous Right to Place, winner of the Robert Park Book Award, examines the social, legal, geospatial, and market forces that intersect to create housing insecurity in manufactured housing communities, which provide a central source of affordable housing in the United States. Prof. Sullivan earned a B.A. from the University of Chicago and holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Margery Turner

Margery Turner is an Institute fellow at the Urban Institute, focusing on research and policy at the intersection of race and place.  A nationally recognized expert on housing and neighborhoods, Ms. Turner has analyzed issues of residential location, racial and ethnic discrimination and its contribution to neighborhood segregation and inequality, and the role of housing policies in promoting residential mobility and location choice. She served as deputy assistant secretary for research at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) from 1993 through 1996, focusing HUD's research agenda on the problems of racial discrimination, concentrated poverty, and economic opportunity in America's metropolitan areas. Ms. Turner has a B.A. from Cornell University and an M.A. in urban and regional planning from the George Washington University.

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Nicole Upano

Nicole Upano serves as Director of Public Policy for the National Apartment Association (NAA). In this role, she leads the team within NAA that conducts research and analysis on industry policy concerns and develops communications materials in support of the apartment industry’s advocacy initiatives at all levels of government. Ms. Upano is a subject matter expert specializing in fair housing, landlord-tenant, and property operations issues. She earned a B.A. from Indiana University.

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