Justice Gap Report 2022

LSC’s latest justice gap report, released April 2022, shows that 92% of the civil legal problems of low-income Americans did not receive any or enough legal help. Nearly three quarters (74%) of low-income households experienced at least one civil legal problem in the previous year.  A third (33%) of low-income Americans had at least one problem they attributed to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Learn How LSC Promotes Equal Access to Justice

LSC promotes equal access to justice by providing funding to 132 independent non-profit legal aid programs in every state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.

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Fiscal Year 2023 Budget Request

LSC requests an appropriation of $1.26 billion for FY 2023, an increase of $245 million from last year’s request. Our request addresses the anticipated increase in demand for civil legal services due to the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 is having on low-income communities, coupled with the ongoing lack of adequate resources to provide civil legal assistance to millions of Americans eligible for LSC-funded services before the pandemic.

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Year-End Message from LSC Board Chairman John G. Levi

As another year comes to a close, read the message from LSC Board Chairman John G. Levi as he reflects on LSC's accomplishments.

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Learn More About LSC

  • Why was LSC created?
  • What is legal aid?
  • Does LSC provide legal aid?
  • What kinds of grants does LSC offer?
  • Where can I find information on legal aid organizations in my area?

Under the Sixth Amendment, Americans are only guaranteed legal assistance for criminal matters. LSC was created to financially support legal aid organizations who assist with civil matters.

Established in 1974, LSC operates as an independent 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation that promotes equal access to justice and provides grants for high-quality civil legal assistance to low-income Americans.

LSC-funded programs help people who live in households with annual incomes at or below 125% of the federal poverty guidelines – in 2021, that is $16,100 for an individual, $33,125 for a family of four. Clients come from every ethnic and age group and live in rural, suburban, and urban areas.

They are the working poor, veterans, homeowners and renters, families with children, farmers, people with disabilities, and the elderly. Women - many of whom are struggling to keep their children safe and their families together - comprise 70% of clients.

LSC is a grant-making organization, distributing nearly 94% of its federal appropriation to eligible nonprofit organizations delivering civil legal aid. LSC awards grants through a competitive process and currently funds 132 independent legal aid organizations. With nearly 852 offices nationwide, these organizations serve thousands of low-income individuals, children, families, seniors, and veterans in every congressional district.

LSC grantees handle the basic civil legal needs of the poor, addressing matters involving safety, subsistence, and family stability. Most legal aid practices are focused on family law, including domestic violence and child support and custody, and on housing matters, including evictions and foreclosures.

LSC promotes equal access to justice by awarding grants to legal services providers through a competitive grants process.

We award grants targeted towards technology initiatives, pro bono innovations, as well as many others. 

Legal Services Corporation currently provides funding to 132 independent nonprofit legal aid organizations in every state, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.

To find an LSC-funded legal aid organization near you, simply enter an address or city at the link below. 

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Fiscal Year 2023 Budget Request

LSC requests an appropriation of $1.26 billion for FY 2023, an increase of $245 million from last year’s request. Our request addresses the anticipated increase in demand for civil legal services due to the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 is having on low-income communities, coupled with the ongoing lack of adequate resources to provide civil legal assistance to millions of Americans eligible for LSC-funded services before the pandemic.

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Justice Gap

The Legal Services Corporation (LSC) contracted with NORC at the University of Chicago to help measure the justice gap among low-income Americans in 2022. LSC defines the justice gap as the difference between the civil legal needs of low-income Americans and the resources available to meet those needs. 

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